Why I Left Pub Crawl

I sent out a brief notification on Twitter, but now the official goodbye post is up over at Pub Crawl.

After two and a half amazing years, with all love and respect, I’m leaving the blog. This post explains why. To read my goodbye to my readers, along with a small recap of my more fun articles, please visit my goodbye post at Pub Crawl.

The short of it is that I’m trying to simplify my life, and give myself as much time and mental clarity as possible to focus on my writing.

The long of it is that as far back as August I knew I had to make a change, but dreaded the process. I dreaded what I would have to give up more than what I knew I would gain.

Then the other day I read a post about writing and not writing. The author said something I’ve heard a million times before, “Talking about writing is not writing.” But he also said something different, something that struck a chord with me: “Writing about writing is not writing.”

Throughout my time at LTWF and Pub Crawl, I became very good about talking about writing, and explaining about writing. But the time devoted to doing that doesn’t actually count as writing time. It’s not furthering my stories. It might clear up some of the noise in my head, but it’s not teaching me about my own novel.

As much as I loved being a part of LTWF, and as proud as I was of Pub Crawl, I’ve reached a point where things have to get condensed, and some things have to be cut. A ‘spring cleaning’ of my life, if you will. I decided a part of that cleaning needed to be stepping down from the blog. I post only once or twice a month, but the administrative requirements of the blog, and the constant checking and planning I do is what really takes up my mental time. Instead of pondering my plot and actively seeking new ideas, I worry about what to write next so I can deliver a quality article for our readers and meet the expectations of my team. I check our traffic stats. I comb Twitter for industry news and inspiration for articles, not my work.

A big deterrent to resigning was giving up the amazing opportunity that LTWF/Pub Crawl has been. I felt almost guilty… how could I even think of throwing in the towel when so many would love to be part of a project like this? I worried about giving up my platform for reaching people, not only from a promotional sense but in a way where I could positively affect the lives of young writers. But here another piece of writing knowledge comes into place: All the promotion in the world means nothing if your book isn’t good.

I can’t deliver a good product to my readers and myself if I stay distracted. And so I choose to refocus all that mental energy into my own projects.

I’m looking forward to my new freedom :-) Pub Crawl wasn’t a drag, not at all, but it was a responsibility, and the relief of that burden is uplifting.

What does this mean for my readers, both here and at the blog? I hope those of you who follow me exclusively at Pub Crawl will also choose to follow me here. I will still post articles as they come to me. I have upcoming stuff planned on magical systems, how to find community online, and the hard lessons of writing. Not to mention my personal rants and revelations, as always :-)

Other positive changes I’ve made include reading instead of watching TV (a resolution constantly being renewed, lol), getting a library card, and feeding my creativity through other mediums, like paper installations, painting, and remodeling my house. I’ve been quite busy, actually, and will make a personal update post soon, I promise :-)

I feel happy, I feel relieved, and I feel ready to get started on this new chapter in my writing life. Thank you so much to everyone who made the past two and a half years amazing. I’m so proud to have been a part of that amazing blog project, and I will treasure that memory always.

<3,

Savannah

16 thoughts on “Why I Left Pub Crawl

  1. As I said at PubCrawl–I wish you all the best. I respect your reasons entirely–and having made similar hard choices, I understand completely when you talk about feeling loss and relief all at the same time :)

    Can I just say–the TV one is tricky and I totally hear you on “constantly renewed!” Cancelling cable helped–now I only have netflix, and I have to actively choose something to watch. Which I only let myself do if a) I’m watching something with my husband or b) I’m sewing at the same time :) Multi-tasking!

    • We didn’t have a TV for about a year and a half… when we got one it was instant video games and movies, and then we got Netflix instant. And now having watched every episode of The Office… and Ugly Americans, and Downton Abbey, and many others, NOT turning on the TV when I get home is a big struggle. I’m trying to restrict it to only background noise while I clean :-) Multitasking FTW!

  2. Best wishes for your renewed focus and switching gears. It can be really tough to do this but what inspired you has also been on my mind for awhile, the whole concept of “talking/writing about writing is not writing.” I find this a difficult balancing act because I’m just trying to get started in the world of maintaining a blog and interacting on Twitter, over the past year, and yet authors I look up to for the most part don’t spend a quarter of their day online like it seems so many thousands of others in publishing do.

    There is a definite need for a platform, and for sharing knowledge and pointing people in the right direction, and even just sharing fun stuff. My feelings on this topic were prompted by two Twitter-shared thoughts. Steve Martin’s infamous tweet, “Angry at myself for finishing my novel instead of tweeting today.” And JK Rowling’s tweet, “This is the real me, but you won’t be hearing from me often I am afraid, as pen and paper is my priority at the moment.”

    Both of these statements made me realise that writing is the absolute most important thing. If I have a choice between tweeting/blogging/commenting about writing, or writing, it has to be the latter. And some days – most days – I don’t have time to choose both. So… it’s gotta be the latter. :)

    Thanks for sharing, and best wishes with your writing (and other) endeavours! :)

  3. Savannah, like I said on PubCrawl I wish you nothing but the best of luck in your future writing endeavours. I will continue to follow you on Facebook and here. I thank you for all the words and wisdom that you gave LTWF and Pub Crawl. I have enjoyed reading them immensely.

  4. Armith-Greenleaf says:

    At first I thought “OH NO!” but after reading this, I understand. Sometimes it’s necessary to go back to basics. I’ve been thinking about this, too; for the past two, almost three years I’ve spread my writing life too thin, and I’m thinking it might be time to regroup my efforts. It would imply a significant paradigm shift on my behalf, and it’s quite intimidating to think about, let alone actually doing it. :/

    I do wish you the best of luck, and I’ll continue to follow you and PC at my current, unavoidable snail pace, heh (uni, I shake my head at you.) I’ll definitely be around! I’m looking forward to those posts about finding community and belonging. :D

    • I so know where you’re at. It’s intimidating, it’s an exhausting thought, and you also don’t quite know how to get started. Eventually you get to a point where you have to decide if you’re going to continue putting off what’s really important (writing), or if it’s not as important as you thought, and maybe it’s time to stop stressing and let it go completely. For a while I wondered if I was one of those people who would discover they worked better on the non-writing side of publishing, but my faith in my writing was too strong for doubts for very long :-)

      Thank you for your well wishes, and I know I’ll still see you around!

  5. I’m glad I can still read your blog here! I love reading your ‘rants’ and the more serious ‘business’ :) I understand the need to want to center yourself so to speak!

  6. Well, maybe some good came out of it…I finally found your blog and will definitely follow here. Best of luck to you, and you’ve always inspired me. :)

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